Tenore

Alexander Gainutdinov

In the choir since 2017

Alexander Gainutdinov is a laureate of various international vocal competitions. In 2008, he graduated from the Glinka State Conservatory (Magnitogorsk). In 2009, he interned at the Accademia Musicale Chigiana (Siena, Italy). In 2004–2014, Alexander Gainutdinov was a soloist at the Magnitogorsk Opera and Ballet Theatre; in 2010–2014, he was a soloist at the Eidinov Magnitogorsk State Academy Choir Capella and at the Magnitogorsk Chamber Choir. In 2014–2017, he was a soloist at the Tyumen Philharmonic.

During the 2016/2017 season, Alexander Gainutdinov was a guest performer at the musicAeterna choir and took part in the following projects at the Perm State Opera and Ballet Theatre: Mendelssohn-Bartholdy’s “Ilia” oratorio (conducted by Raphael Pichon), Berio’s “Coro” (conducted by Teodor Currentzis), Bach’s “Magnificat” (conducted by Martin Sandhoff). Since the 2017/2018 season, he has been part of the musicAeterna choir.

WHEN DID YOU DECIDE TO MAKE MUSIC YOUR JOB?
It was pretty much trite in my case. First, my parents took me to music school; later on, they convinced me to go to music college and to the conservatory. I did not object because to be frank, I still had no idea what I wanted to do at that point. I liked philology and was also interested in chemistry and biology. I was considering medical school as an option. Back then, I was not particularly fond of music theater; I found opera too abstract and disjointed from real life. But it literally took me just half a year of studies to change my views and to get what opera was really about.
SO WHAT IS OPERA REALLY ABOUT?
The thing is, opera is like a unique reference system. It is a completely different dimension. Once you have entered it, you start discovering and following the peculiar laws of that world.
WHAT CHANGES WITHIN YOU WHEN YOU GO UP ON STAGE?
On stage, you create an image for yourself and try to fit into the world created by the director and the conductor. It gets so immersive that at some point you ask yourself: why am I really so happy or so sad? And then you realize that the emotions you experience are actually your character’s, not your own. This is just as enjoyable as the games you used to play in your childhood!
WHAT DO YOU DO IN YOUR SPARE TIME?
I like to create something, be it music or text. In my youth, I wrote poems and even published them. Now I am getting back to doing the same. Also, I have plans for a series of sci-fi stories.
WHAT INSPIRES YOU TO CREATE?
Non-creative life is boring. This alone is enough to inspire me.

musicAeterna choir events

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Dmitry Shostakovich
Ten Poems on Texts of Revolutionary Poets (1951, Op. 88)

Frank Martin (1890-1974)
Mass for Double Choir (1926)

Goffredo Petrassi (1904-2003)
“Nonsense”, for mixed choir on poems by Edward Lear (1952)

Gyorgy Ligeti (1923-2006)
“Nonsense Madrigals” for male voices (1993)

Alexey Syumak
“1948” (world premiere!)

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Dmitry Shostakovich
Ten Poems on Texts of Revolutionary Poets (1951, Op. 88)

Frank Martin (1890-1974)
Mass for Double Choir (1926)

Goffredo Petrassi (1904-2003)
“Nonsense”, for mixed choir on poems by Edward Lear (1952)

Gyorgy Ligeti (1923-2006)
“Nonsense Madrigals” for male voices (1993)

Alexey Syumak
“1948” (world premiere!)

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Georgy Sviridov (1915-1998)
Choir Concert “Pushkin Wreath”

Frank Martin (1890-1974)
Mass for Double Choir (1926)

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An event of residency

Philippe Hersant
Choral Opera Tristia (2016)

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An event of residency

Dmitri Shostakovich
Ten Poems on Texts of Revolutionary Poets (1951, Op. 88)

Dmitri Smirnov
Prayers from St. John Chrysostom’s Liturgy for mixed choir