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Arseniy Yuryev

In the orchestra since 2019

Arseniy Yuriev is the winner of the young performers’ competition at the “VIVAT, TALANT” festival project (Saint Petersburg, 2008) and the “IN CORPORE 2010” International music festival (Tallinn, 2010). He is a laureate of the M. Yudina XIIth International competition for young pianists, piano duets and chamber ensembles (“Chamber ensemble” section, Saint Petersburg, 2011). In 2009–2013, he received a scholarship from Russian Standard Bank.

Arseniy Yuriev was born on February 4, 1992 in Saint Petersburg. He finished Children’s music school №28 in 2005. In 2010, he finished the Special secondary school at the Rimsky-Korsakov conservatory where he had studied viola playing under D.G. Meerovich. He went on to study at the Rimsky-Korsakov Saint Petersburg State Conservatory (E.A. Brodotskiy’s class), from which he graduated in 2015. In summer 2017, Arseniy completed his postgraduate studies under V.I. Stopichev. Arseniy Yuriev has also participated in master classes by M. Furie, A. Dogadin, M. Fedotov, V. Stopichev, F. Belugin, Yu. Bashmet, P. Iodt, T. Mazurenko, and T. Riebl.

Arseniy took part in the «Young Artists Festival in Bayreuth» (2008) and «International Summer Academy for Young Artists» (Marktoberdorf, 2012–2014).

As a soloist, he performs in Russia and abroad. He has taken part in projects by the Music House in Saint Petersburg. Arseniy has played in an ensemble together with S. Redkin, P. Milyukov, D. Smirnov, S. Roldugin and other outstanding musicians. He has played in the Saint Petersburg Philharmonic orchestra, the Saint Petersburg Capella orchestra, and the orchestras of Lahti and Tampere (Finland).

Since November 2019, Arseniy Yuriev has been a member of the musicAeterna orchestra.

WHAT HAS BEEN YOUR GREATEST MUSICAL IMPRESSION?
Yuri Bashmet’s concert at the Mariinsky hall in 2008 with a viola version of a clarinet quintet. I also remember Matveev (bass) singing Mephisto’s part in Gounod’s opera at the Mikhailovsky theatre. Buchbinder, Krylov and Tileman at the Mariinsky hall were very impressive, as was Sokolov at the Grand Hall of the Philharmonic. I’m now marveling at the virtuosity of various performers on Instagram and YouTube since there are no other ways to get in touch with the modern music world now. I was also lucky to be at Thomas Riebl’s class where one of his students played a vibrato exercise: first with slow and powerful motions, then with faster ones, then back to slow. It went on for around 3 minutes and felt like an actual piece of music. That was unforgettable.
WHAT PIECE OF MUSIC DO YOU DREAM TO PERFORM?
As a soloist, I dream to play Paganini’s sonata at the level of Ayne Kozasa and Marco Misciagna (check out the recordings on YouTube), and also to master the violin repertoire such as Bach’s Partitas and some of Paganini’s Caprices. As for more realistic things, I’d like to learn to play in a quartet. I’m particularly interested in quartets by Schuller, Vernick and Ades. And speaking of orchestra work, I’ve always wanted to play all of Bruckner and Mahler.
DO YOU CHANGE SOMEHOW WHEN YOU GO UP ON STAGE?
When on stage, I’m particularly focused, and I feel the responsibility for all the work I’ve done so far. Maintaining the balance between the technical and musical sides is key: one shouldn’t overshadow the other.
CAN YOU IMAGINE BEING ANYTHING ELSE BUT A MUSICIAN?
I can’t. I could perhaps be a composer — which is a role simultaneously greater and lesser than that of a regular musician. But this feels like a dead-end path in our time of mass-produced music, particularly if you stick to your principles. Does the world need new music anyway if it won’t change the people, the way they live, or anything else? That is, unless you want to momentarily stroke your ego with the illusion of having reached something greater and entertained the audience with a sequence of sounds and meanings. Trying to create this kind of legacy feels like an utterly pointless effort in the modern world. At the same time, that was exactly how the great European music of the past was created: otherwise, you get yet another instantly forgettable result instead of a masterpiece. Thinking, creating music, raving mad — these things are all pretty much the same as long as you do them sincerely and know what you’re doing. On the one hand, it’s complex and frightening, and it implies great responsibility.
WHAT DO YOU VALUE THE MOST IN WORKING WITH MUSICAETERNA?
I feel lucky and honoured to be in such an ensemble. It has lots of high-level musicians (regardless of how famous they are individually), each being a great role model. A person with a very sophisticated and unorthodox sense of music, Teodor Currentzis has managed to create something like a small world inside the troupe — a world with its own vibes and unwritten rules which are still somewhat a mystery to me. As a result, music isn’t a routine here; instead, it’s a product of united effort by people on the same wavelength.

musicAeterna orchestra events

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Gustav Mahler
Symphony No. 5 in C sharp minor (1901-1902)

Alexey Retinsky
“Anaphora” for Symphony Orchestra (World Premiere)

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An event of Moscow residency

Gustav Mahler
Symphony No. 5 in C sharp minor (1901-1902)

Alexey Retinsky
“Anaphora” for Symphony Orchestra

An event of Moscow residency
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An event of Moscow residency

Gustav Mahler
Symphony No. 5 in C sharp minor (1901-1902)

Alexey Retinsky
“Anaphora” for Symphony Orchestra

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Gustav Mahler
Symphony No. 5 in C sharp minor (1901-1902)

Alexey Retinsky
“Anaphora” for Symphony Orchestra