Alto

Olga Strelnikova

In the choir since 2017

Olga Strelnikova was born in Elektrougli (Moscow oblast, Russia). She
graduated form Scriabin Moscow Oblast Music College in 2010 and from the Popov Academy of Choral Art (specializing in music and theatre arts) in 2016. Olga Strelnikova is laureate of the International Arts Olympiad (2011).

She participated in master classes by Christa Ludwig and S.G. Nesterenko. In 2014 – 2016, she performed with the choir of the Stanislavski and Nemirovich-Danchenko Moscow Academic Music Theatre. In 2016 – 2017, she performed with the Yurlov Russian State Academic Choir. Since 2017, Olga Strelnikova has been part of the musicAeterna choir.

WHAT BROUGHT YOU TO THE WORLD OF MUSIC?
I wanted to sing like Tarja Turunen and perform with a rock band. I got into music quite late. Of course, there was music school in my childhood but I hated it and eventually dropped out; my parents did not put any pressure on me. When I was 15, I got back to studying music. It was jazz vocal at first, but my teacher heard academic bits in my voice and once brought me an arietta to sing. I started singing it and suddenly realized I absolutely loved it. That is how I discovered my love towards classical music. I had a wild desire to discover as much as I could in that realm, which was completely new to me. I entered music college and managed to graduate with honors — which was very hard to do with no basic skills. But this is my way of doing things: I always give my 100%.
WHAT DO YOU THINK MAKES MUSICIANS DIFFERENT FROM OTHER PEOPLE?
Our perception of the world is completely different. When you constantly listen to classical music and try to understand all the thoughts, feelings and emotions implied by the composer, your own senses start to develop in a different way. You begin to perceive the surrounding world and all its events in a much sharper manner. Besides, musicians have some sort of inborn talent and love towards music and art; without those, it is hard to dedicate all your life to something that demands so much energy and emotion.
THIS TALENT THAT YOU MENTIONED — WHAT DOES IT IMPLY?
I think it implies the ability to find beauty in every detail, even in the most mundane one. A creative person always sees this beauty which may be concealed from others.
WHAT INSPIRES YOU?
The surrounding world does. If I feel tired and exhausted, I try spend some time outdoors, amidst nature. This helps me to relax and get myself together. I am an introverted person, so I try to listen to myself and discover inner sources of inspiration. Books certainly help to find new ideas, as does art in general. I believe discovering the surrounding world is key: this way, you can draw inspiration from more and more sources.
WHAT DOES MUSICAETERNA MEAN TO YOU?
MusicAeterna is a relentless search for beauty, a sincere love towards music, a light in the soul and a fire in performance. It is darkness and hope, it is freedom, it is beauty and sadness, it is infinite wisdom. We create our own reality, our own world. We take our thoughts to infinity from which we do not want to return. Working here empowers your soul and your heart.

musicAeterna choir events

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Dmitry Shostakovich
Ten Poems on Texts of Revolutionary Poets (1951, Op. 88)

Frank Martin (1890-1974)
Mass for Double Choir (1926)

Goffredo Petrassi (1904-2003)
“Nonsense”, for mixed choir on poems by Edward Lear (1952)

Gyorgy Ligeti (1923-2006)
“Nonsense Madrigals” for male voices (1993)

Alexey Syumak
“1948” (world premiere!)

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Dmitry Shostakovich
Ten Poems on Texts of Revolutionary Poets (1951, Op. 88)

Frank Martin (1890-1974)
Mass for Double Choir (1926)

Goffredo Petrassi (1904-2003)
“Nonsense”, for mixed choir on poems by Edward Lear (1952)

Gyorgy Ligeti (1923-2006)
“Nonsense Madrigals” for male voices (1993)

Alexey Syumak
“1948” (world premiere!)

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Georgy Sviridov (1915-1998)
Choir Concert “Pushkin Wreath”

Frank Martin (1890-1974)
Mass for Double Choir (1926)

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An event of residency

Philippe Hersant
Choral Opera Tristia (2016)

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An event of residency

Dmitri Shostakovich
Ten Poems on Texts of Revolutionary Poets (1951, Op. 88)

Dmitri Smirnov
Prayers from St. John Chrysostom’s Liturgy for mixed choir