Bassoon

Olzhas Ashirmatov

In the orchestra since 2019

Olzhas Ashirmatov was born on November 3, 1987 in Almaty, Kazakhstan. In 2007, he finished the Akhmet Zhubanov Kazakh Republic specialized music school for talented children where he had studied under Yuri Lukichev and Nurtas Aigalkaev. In 2011, he graduated from Hochschule für Musik, Theater und Medien Hannover (class of professor Dag Jensen). In 2011–2016, he studied at Hochschule für Musik und Theater München (class of professor Dag Jensen).

Olzhas Ashirmatov is the first prize laureate of the Republican young wind and percussion performers’ competition (2004, Almaty), the second prize laureate of the Shabyt International wind and percussion competition (2005, Astana), the second prize laureate of the International wind instruments competition (2005, Novosibirsk), and the first prize laureate of the Batyrkhan Shukenov First Republican woodwind competition (2018, Almaty).

In 2012, he interned at the academy orchestra of the Schleswig Holstein music festival. Since October 2017, he has been a regulator soloist at the State Academic Symphony Orchestra at the Zhambyl Kazakh State Philharmonic. Since November 2019, Olzhas Ashirmatov has been a regulator soloist at the musicAeterna orchestra.

HOW DID YOUR MUSICAL CAREER BEGIN?
I used to be a hyperactive child, and my parents made me go to all sorts of classes so that my energy wouldn’t be wasted. One of those classes was a music studio. Between 10 and 12 years of age, I was learning to play the piano and the recorder; since 13, I began playing the bassoon. I didn’t like the instrument at first but my parents knew how to motivate me. “If you practice hard, you’ll win a competition,” they said. That was a huge incentive for me, and the results came soon enough. Gradually, what started as a “sporting interest” turned into a great love — all due to my teachers, Yuri Lukichev and Nurtas Aigalkaev. Perhaps the most pivotal point was when I managed to become a student of Dag Jensen, who is the world’s best bassoon teacher.
SO YOU ARE A VENTUROUS PERSON?
In my childhood, I always wanted to be the winner at everything. Thing have changed since then along with my views. Nowadays, I value a quiet and steady lifestyle as well as high-quality work. It’s impossible to chase victory all the time. In that race, it’s too easy to forget about the most important parts in life: health and human relationships. I’m trying to find balance and harmony in life now.
ASIDE FROM MUSIC, WHAT ELSE CAN GIVE YOU EMOTIONS JUST AS STRONG?
Love probably can, as romantic as it might sound. Love towards my parents, my homeland, my girlfriend. Dedication to my craft. I got greatly inspired when I returned to my home country, which I’m strongly attached to. On the other hand, the Kazakhs have historically been nomads, so I find joy in travelling. I’m happy that we Eastern people can offer the West a new view of music.
WHAT MAKES MUSICAETERNA SPECIAL?
It accumulates some incredibly powerful energy in itself. Maestro oversees it all with his otherworldly virtuosity and unique artistic vision. Everyone follows him and his ideas. I think there’s much we can tell the music world about.
WHAT WOULD YOU LIKE TO PERFORM TOGETHER WITH THE ENSEMBLE?
Absolutely anything. I’m interested in everything there is to play. My all-time favourite composer is Mozart. I’m now going to master the baroque and classical bassoon; as soon as I reach my goal, I’ll be able to play my favourite music on authentic instruments together with a wonderful orchestra.

musicAeterna orchestra events

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Gustav Mahler
Symphony No. 5 in C sharp minor (1901-1902)

Alexey Retinsky
“Anaphora” for Symphony Orchestra (World Premiere)

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An event of Moscow residency

Gustav Mahler
Symphony No. 5 in C sharp minor (1901-1902)

Alexey Retinsky
“Anaphora” for Symphony Orchestra

An event of Moscow residency
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An event of Moscow residency

Gustav Mahler
Symphony No. 5 in C sharp minor (1901-1902)

Alexey Retinsky
“Anaphora” for Symphony Orchestra

+

Gustav Mahler
Symphony No. 5 in C sharp minor (1901-1902)

Alexey Retinsky
“Anaphora” for Symphony Orchestra