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Bassoons

Olzhas Ashirmatov

In the orchestra since 2019

Olzhas Ashirmatov was born on November 3, 1987 in Almaty, Kazakhstan. In 2007, he finished the Akhmet Zhubanov Kazakh Republic specialized music school for talented children where he had studied under Yuri Lukichev and Nurtas Aigalkaev. In 2011, he graduated from Hochschule für Musik, Theater und Medien Hannover (class of professor Dag Jensen). In 2011–2016, he studied at Hochschule für Musik und Theater München (class of professor Dag Jensen).

Olzhas Ashirmatov is the first prize laureate of the Republican young wind and percussion performers’ competition (2004, Almaty), the second prize laureate of the Shabyt International wind and percussion competition (2005, Astana), the second prize laureate of the International wind instruments competition (2005, Novosibirsk), and the first prize laureate of the Batyrkhan Shukenov First Republican woodwind competition (2018, Almaty).

In 2012, he interned at the academy orchestra of the Schleswig Holstein music festival. Since October 2017, he has been a regulator soloist at the State Academic Symphony Orchestra at the Zhambyl Kazakh State Philharmonic. Since November 2019, Olzhas Ashirmatov has been a regulator soloist at the musicAeterna orchestra.

HOW DID YOUR MUSICAL CAREER BEGIN?
I used to be a hyperactive child, and my parents made me go to all sorts of classes so that my energy wouldn’t be wasted. One of those classes was a music studio. Between 10 and 12 years of age, I was learning to play the piano and the recorder; since 13, I began playing the bassoon. I didn’t like the instrument at first but my parents knew how to motivate me. “If you practice hard, you’ll win a competition,” they said. That was a huge incentive for me, and the results came soon enough. Gradually, what started as a “sporting interest” turned into a great love — all due to my teachers, Yuri Lukichev and Nurtas Aigalkaev. Perhaps the most pivotal point was when I managed to become a student of Dag Jensen, who is the world’s best bassoon teacher.
SO YOU ARE A VENTUROUS PERSON?
In my childhood, I always wanted to be the winner at everything. Thing have changed since then along with my views. Nowadays, I value a quiet and steady lifestyle as well as high-quality work. It’s impossible to chase victory all the time. In that race, it’s too easy to forget about the most important parts in life: health and human relationships. I’m trying to find balance and harmony in life now.
ASIDE FROM MUSIC, WHAT ELSE CAN GIVE YOU EMOTIONS JUST AS STRONG?
Love probably can, as romantic as it might sound. Love towards my parents, my homeland, my girlfriend. Dedication to my craft. I got greatly inspired when I returned to my home country, which I’m strongly attached to. On the other hand, the Kazakhs have historically been nomads, so I find joy in travelling. I’m happy that we Eastern people can offer the West a new view of music.
WHAT MAKES MUSICAETERNA SPECIAL?
It accumulates some incredibly powerful energy in itself. Maestro oversees it all with his otherworldly virtuosity and unique artistic vision. Everyone follows him and his ideas. I think there’s much we can tell the music world about.
WHAT WOULD YOU LIKE TO PERFORM TOGETHER WITH THE ENSEMBLE?
Absolutely anything. I’m interested in everything there is to play. My all-time favourite composer is Mozart. I’m now going to master the baroque and classical bassoon; as soon as I reach my goal, I’ll be able to play my favourite music on authentic instruments together with a wonderful orchestra.

musicAeterna orchestra events

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Antonín Dvořák (1841–1904)
Cello Concerto in B Minor, Op. 104, B. 191 (1894–1895)
Allegro
Adagio ma non troppo
Finale. Allegro moderato

Symphony No. 8 in G Major, Op. 88, B. 163 (1889)
Allegro con brio
Adagio
Allegretto grazioso
Molto Vivace
Allegro ma non troppo

The musicAeterna Orchestra
Soloist Alexey Zhilin
Conductor Alexander Sladkovsky

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Jean-Philippe Rameau (1683–1764)
The thunderstorm scene from Act II of the opera-ballet Platée ou Junon jalouse (1745)
Act IV, Scene 4: Entry of the muse Polyhymnia from the lyrical tragedy Abaris ou les Boreades (1763)
Tambourines I, II from the prologue to the lyrical tragedy Dardanus (1739)

Antonio Lotti (1667–1740)
Crucifixus a 8 voci from Credo in F Major (before 1717)

Antonio Vivaldi (1678–1741)
Concerto for Cello and Strings in C Minor, RV 401 (late 1720s)

  1. Allegro non molto
  2. Adagio
  3. Allegro ma non molto

The soloist Rabbani Aldangor

George Frideric Handel (1685–1759)
Ombra mai fu (There was never a shadow), aria of Xerxes from Act I of the opera Xerxes, HWV 40 (1738)
The soloist Andrey Nemzer, countertenor
Furie terribili! (Terrible Furies!), aria of Armida from Act I of the opera Rinaldo, HWV 7a (1711/1731)
The soloist Elizaveta Sveshnikova, soprano
Piangerò la sorte mia (I will mourn my fate), aria of Cleopatra from Act III of the opera Julius Caesar, HWV 17, (1724)
The soloist Elizaveta Sveshnikova, soprano
Venti, turbini (Winds, whirlwinds), aria of Rinaldo from Act I of the opera Rinaldo, HWV 7a (1711/1731)
The soloist Andrey Nemzer, countertenor

Johann Sebastian Bach (1685–1750)
Komm, Jesu, komm (Come, Jesus, come), motet for double choir in G minor, BWV 229 (before 1731–1732)
Lobet den Herrn, alle Heiden (Praise the Lord, all ye nations), motet for four-voice choir, dubbing instruments and basso continuo in C major, BWV 230 (n.d.)
Erbarme dich, mein Gott (Have mercy, my God), aria of the alto No. 39 (47) from the sacred oratorio St Matthew Passion, BWV 244 (1727–1729/1736)
Soloists:
Andrey Nemzer, countertenor
Vladislav Pesin, violin

George Frideric Handel
Lascia la spina, cogli la rosa (Leave the thorn, pluck the rose), aria of Pleasure from Act II of the oratorio The Triumph of Time and Disillusion, HWV 46a (1707)
Soloists:
Elizaveta Sveshnikova, soprano
Andrey Nemzer, countertenor

Jean-Philippe Rameau
Les Sauvages/Forêts paisibles (The Savages/Peaceful Forests) from Act IV of the opera-ballet The Gallant Indies, (1725/1736)

Duration: 60 minutes

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Jean-Philippe Rameau (1683–1764)
The thunderstorm scene from Act II of the opera-ballet Platée ou Junon jalouse (1745)
Act IV, Scene 4: Entry of the muse Polyhymnia from the lyrical tragedy Abaris ou les Boreades (1763)
Tambourines I, II from the prologue to the lyrical tragedy Dardanus (1739)

Antonio Lotti (1667–1740)
Crucifixus a 8 voci from Credo in F Major (before 1717)

Antonio Vivaldi (1678–1741)
Concerto for Cello and Strings in C Minor, RV 401 (late 1720s)

  1. Allegro non molto
  2. Adagio
  3. Allegro ma non molto

The soloist Rabbani Aldangor

George Frideric Handel (1685–1759)
Ombra mai fu (There was never a shadow), aria of Xerxes from Act I of the opera Xerxes, HWV 40 (1738)
The soloist Andrey Nemzer, countertenor
Furie terribili! (Terrible Furies!), aria of Armida from Act I of the opera Rinaldo, HWV 7a (1711/1731)
The soloist Elizaveta Sveshnikova, soprano
Piangerò la sorte mia (I will mourn my fate), aria of Cleopatra from Act III of the opera Julius Caesar, HWV 17, (1724)
The soloist Elizaveta Sveshnikova, soprano
Venti, turbini (Winds, whirlwinds), aria of Rinaldo from Act I of the opera Rinaldo, HWV 7a (1711/1731)
The soloist Andrey Nemzer, countertenor

Johann Sebastian Bach (1685–1750)
Komm, Jesu, komm (Come, Jesus, come), motet for double choir in G minor, BWV 229 (before 1731–1732)
Lobet den Herrn, alle Heiden (Praise the Lord, all ye nations), motet for four-voice choir, dubbing instruments and basso continuo in C major, BWV 230 (n.d.)
Erbarme dich, mein Gott (Have mercy, my God), aria of the alto No. 39 (47) from the sacred oratorio St Matthew Passion, BWV 244 (1727–1729/1736)
Soloists:
Andrey Nemzer, countertenor
Vladislav Pesin, violin

George Frideric Handel
Lascia la spina, cogli la rosa (Leave the thorn, pluck the rose), aria of Pleasure from Act II of the oratorio The Triumph of Time and Disillusion, HWV 46a (1707)
Soloists:
Elizaveta Sveshnikova, soprano
Andrey Nemzer, countertenor

Jean-Philippe Rameau
Les Sauvages/Forêts paisibles (The Savages/Peaceful Forests) from Act IV of the opera-ballet The Gallant Indies, (1725/1736)

Duration: 60 minutes

Sold out
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An event of Diaghilev Festival

Johann Sebastian Bach (1685–1750)
The St Matthew Passion

a sacred oratorio for solo voices, double choir and double orchestra with libretto by Picander (Christian Friedrich Henrici), BWV 244 (1727–1729/1736)

MusicAeterna Choir and Orchestra
Guest soloists
Conductor Teodor Currentzis

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An event of Diaghilev Festival

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756–1791)
The Magic Flute, an opera-singspiel K.620 (1791)

Libretto by Emanuel Schikaneder
Director Nina Vorobyova
Musical Director and Conductor Evgeny Vorobyov
Guest soloists
The musicAeterna Orchestra

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