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Violаs

Lyubov Lazareva

In the orchestra since 2022

She studied at the Gnessin Moscow Special School of Music in the class of Elena Ozol and graduated from the Tchaikovsky Moscow State Conservatory (the class of associate professor Roman Balashov). She took part in master classes by Yuri Bashmet, Wilfried Strehle, Hartmut Rohde, Beatrice Muthelet, and Enrico Carraro.

She is the Laureate of the V All-Russian Competition For Symphony Orchestra Artists (II prize), the IV Rubinstein International Competition of Chamber Ensembles (as a member of the Rebellion Quartet, III prize), the IX Yuri Bashmet International Viola Masters Competition (I Prize, 2023).

She worked in the orchestras of the Verbier Festival (2016–2017) and the Tsinandali Festival (2019). She took part in the Prityazhenie Festival, the Winter International Art Festival in Sochi, etc.

From 2019 to 2021, she was concertmaster and soloist of the Moscow Conservatory Chamber Orchestra conducted by Felix Korobov. She has collaborated with such ensembles as the Musica Viva Chamber Orchestra, the Russian National Orchestra, the Moscow State Academic Symphony Orchestra conducted by Pavel Kogan, the Moscow Soloists Chamber Orchestra, PerSimfAns, Questa Musica, the Russian National Youth Symphony Orchestra, the Gnessin Virtuosi Chamber Orchestra, and the All-Russian Yuri Bashmet Youth Symphony Orchestra. She is the member of the string Rebellion Quartet (Ivan Naborshchikov, Inna Yakusheva – violins, Ilya Mikhailov – cello).

She has toured in Germany, Italy, France, China, Singapore, South Korea, and Georgia.

HOW DID YOU START WORKING AT MUSICAETERNA?
For the first time I heard musicAeterna when they performed Shostakovich's Symphony No. 7. As a conservatory student, I made it to an open rehearsal. I was struck by the magnetism of the conductor and how sensitively the musicians react to his remarks. A few years later, I was invited to work in the viola group in a joint project of the conservatory and the orchestra: we played Desyatnikov's The Rite of Winter and Strauss's Metamorphosen. This experience had a great impact on me, and my heart soared with the hope of collaborating with musicAeterna further. Soon I had the opportunity to participate in the work of the orchestra again as a guest artist, and in 2022 I applied for an audition and was offered a permanent position. Previously, I collaborated with various chamber and symphony orchestras as a concertmaster and soloist. I am happy that the musicAeterna Orchestra has become my first official permanent job.
WHAT MAKES MUSICAETERNA DIFFER FROM OTHER ENSEMBLES?
The amount of work in musicAeterna is huge. Standard orchestral rehearsals last only 3-4 days, at musicAeterna we rehearse for at least two weeks – this is a tremendously deep immersion in the material. As a result, a much more qualitative study of details is obtained. Teodor Currentzis is an amazing conductor, he is attentive to every musician and is ready to share his ideas and suggest directions for growth.
WHY DID YOU CHOOSE YOUR INSTRUMENT?
As a child, I tried my hand at many occupations: I played tennis and took oriental dance classes. My parents limited me in no way. One day my grandmother suggested that I study music, I chose the class of violin – I was struck by some violin concert on TV. In the process of studying, the violin transformed into the viola. Now I understand that this instrument, its deep timbre and colorful sound – softer than that of a violin – perfectly suits my temperament.
WHICH OF THE MUSICIANS INFLUENCED YOU?
When I switched from violin to viola, I began to listen to Yuri Bashmet's recordings. I love quartet music making, which I owe to my wonderful teachers – Elena Ivanovna Ozol and Vladimir Vladimirovich Balshin. The viola is largely not a solo instrument, but a chamber, quartet instrument, it has the function of the middle voice in the score. My gold standard chamber ensemble is the Borodin State Quartet.
WHAT ARE YOUR FAVOURITE MUSIC PIECES?
I can endlessly listen to the second movement of Beethoven's Symphony No. 7. Currently, I have Pink Floyd's album The Dark Side of the Moon on my playlist on repeat. In my free time, I like to read foreign classics – Mann, Sartre, London. Now, for example, I'm reading The Magic Mountain. I used to read Russian literature voraciously. I've read all of Dostoevsky and a lot of Leo Tolstoy. I used to make lists of what I definitely have to read, but now I choose a book following a momentary desire.

musicAeterna orchestra events

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Jean-Philippe Rameau (1683–1764)
The thunderstorm scene from Act II of the opera-ballet Platée ou Junon jalouse (1745)
Act IV, Scene 4: Entry of the muse Polyhymnia from the lyrical tragedy Abaris ou les Boreades (1763)
Tambourines I, II from the prologue to the lyrical tragedy Dardanus (1739)

Antonio Lotti (1667–1740)
Crucifixus a 8 voci from Credo in F Major (before 1717)

Antonio Vivaldi (1678–1741)
Concerto for Cello and Strings in C Minor, RV 401 (late 1720s)

  1. Allegro non molto
  2. Adagio
  3. Allegro ma non molto

The soloist Rabbani Aldangor

George Frideric Handel (1685–1759)
Ombra mai fu (There was never a shadow), aria of Xerxes from Act I of the opera Xerxes, HWV 40 (1738)
The soloist Andrey Nemzer, countertenor
Furie terribili! (Terrible Furies!), aria of Armida from Act I of the opera Rinaldo, HWV 7a (1711/1731)
The soloist Elizaveta Sveshnikova, soprano
Piangerò la sorte mia (I will mourn my fate), aria of Cleopatra from Act III of the opera Julius Caesar, HWV 17, (1724)
The soloist Elizaveta Sveshnikova, soprano
Venti, turbini (Winds, whirlwinds), aria of Rinaldo from Act I of the opera Rinaldo, HWV 7a (1711/1731)
The soloist Andrey Nemzer, countertenor

Johann Sebastian Bach (1685–1750)
Komm, Jesu, komm (Come, Jesus, come), motet for double choir in G minor, BWV 229 (before 1731–1732)
Lobet den Herrn, alle Heiden (Praise the Lord, all ye nations), motet for four-voice choir, dubbing instruments and basso continuo in C major, BWV 230 (n.d.)
Erbarme dich, mein Gott (Have mercy, my God), aria of the alto No. 39 (47) from the sacred oratorio St Matthew Passion, BWV 244 (1727–1729/1736)
Soloists:
Andrey Nemzer, countertenor
Vladislav Pesin, violin

George Frideric Handel
Lascia la spina, cogli la rosa (Leave the thorn, pluck the rose), aria of Pleasure from Act II of the oratorio The Triumph of Time and Disillusion, HWV 46a (1707)
Soloists:
Elizaveta Sveshnikova, soprano
Andrey Nemzer, countertenor

Jean-Philippe Rameau
Les Sauvages/Forêts paisibles (The Savages/Peaceful Forests) from Act IV of the opera-ballet The Gallant Indies, (1725/1736)

Duration: 60 minutes

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Jean-Philippe Rameau (1683–1764)
The thunderstorm scene from Act II of the opera-ballet Platée ou Junon jalouse (1745)
Act IV, Scene 4: Entry of the muse Polyhymnia from the lyrical tragedy Abaris ou les Boreades (1763)
Tambourines I, II from the prologue to the lyrical tragedy Dardanus (1739)

Antonio Lotti (1667–1740)
Crucifixus a 8 voci from Credo in F Major (before 1717)

Antonio Vivaldi (1678–1741)
Concerto for Cello and Strings in C Minor, RV 401 (late 1720s)

  1. Allegro non molto
  2. Adagio
  3. Allegro ma non molto

The soloist Rabbani Aldangor

George Frideric Handel (1685–1759)
Ombra mai fu (There was never a shadow), aria of Xerxes from Act I of the opera Xerxes, HWV 40 (1738)
The soloist Andrey Nemzer, countertenor
Furie terribili! (Terrible Furies!), aria of Armida from Act I of the opera Rinaldo, HWV 7a (1711/1731)
The soloist Elizaveta Sveshnikova, soprano
Piangerò la sorte mia (I will mourn my fate), aria of Cleopatra from Act III of the opera Julius Caesar, HWV 17, (1724)
The soloist Elizaveta Sveshnikova, soprano
Venti, turbini (Winds, whirlwinds), aria of Rinaldo from Act I of the opera Rinaldo, HWV 7a (1711/1731)
The soloist Andrey Nemzer, countertenor

Johann Sebastian Bach (1685–1750)
Komm, Jesu, komm (Come, Jesus, come), motet for double choir in G minor, BWV 229 (before 1731–1732)
Lobet den Herrn, alle Heiden (Praise the Lord, all ye nations), motet for four-voice choir, dubbing instruments and basso continuo in C major, BWV 230 (n.d.)
Erbarme dich, mein Gott (Have mercy, my God), aria of the alto No. 39 (47) from the sacred oratorio St Matthew Passion, BWV 244 (1727–1729/1736)
Soloists:
Andrey Nemzer, countertenor
Vladislav Pesin, violin

George Frideric Handel
Lascia la spina, cogli la rosa (Leave the thorn, pluck the rose), aria of Pleasure from Act II of the oratorio The Triumph of Time and Disillusion, HWV 46a (1707)
Soloists:
Elizaveta Sveshnikova, soprano
Andrey Nemzer, countertenor

Jean-Philippe Rameau
Les Sauvages/Forêts paisibles (The Savages/Peaceful Forests) from Act IV of the opera-ballet The Gallant Indies, (1725/1736)

Duration: 60 minutes

Sold out
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An event of Diaghilev Festival

Johann Sebastian Bach (1685–1750)
The St Matthew Passion

a sacred oratorio for solo voices, double choir and double orchestra with libretto by Picander (Christian Friedrich Henrici), BWV 244 (1727–1729/1736)

MusicAeterna Choir and Orchestra
Guest soloists
Conductor Teodor Currentzis

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An event of Diaghilev Festival

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756–1791)
The Magic Flute, an opera-singspiel K.620 (1791)

Libretto by Emanuel Schikaneder
Director Nina Vorobyova
Musical Director and Conductor Evgeny Vorobyov
Guest soloists
The musicAeterna Orchestra

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An event of Diaghilev Festival

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756–1791)
The Magic Flute, an opera-singspiel K.620 (1791)

Libretto by Emanuel Schikaneder
Director Nina Vorobyova
Musical Director and Conductor Evgeny Vorobyov
Guest soloists
The musicAeterna Orchestra

Sold out