Percussion

Andrey Volosovsky

In the orchestra since 2018

Andrey Volosovsky is a talented marimba and percussion player.

Born in 1985 in Moscow, Andrey gave his first solo performance at the age of 9 while studying at the Ippolitov-Ivanov music school (Sergei Koldobsky’s class). During his studies there, he also received a scholarship from the Moscow Culture Department. Andrey went on to study at the Academic music college at the Moscow Conservatory (Anatoliy Kurashov’s class, 2000–2004) and then at the Moscow Conservatory (Viktor Grishin’s class, 2004–2009). During his conservatory years, Andrey Volosovsky fell in love with marimba playing and went on to hone his skills at Hochschule für Musik und Theater Stuttgart (class of professor Klaus Tresselt). He completed his postgraduate degree at the Moscow Conservatory.

Andrey tours a lot both as a soloist and as a chamber ensemble member. He has given guest performances with numerous Russian and foreign troupes: the “New Russia” State symphony orchestra conducted by Yuri Bashmet, the Russian State Academic Capella directed by Valery Polyansky, The Moscow State Academic Symphony Orchestra directed by Pavel Kogan, the Moscow chamber orchestra at the Pavel Slobodkin Centre, Dmitry Pokrovsky’s ensemble, the “Musica Viva” ensemble directed by Alexander Rudin, and the “Anima Eterna” ensemble (Belgium).

In 2013–2018, he was a soloist at the Moscow Philharmonic Academic Symphony Orchestra. Since 2018, Andrey Volosovsky has been a member of the musicAeterna orchestra conducted by Teodor Currentzis.

Andrey Volosovsky has performed at numerous festivals in Russia and abroad, such as Purmerade (the Netherlands), the International Youth Music Festival (Zurich, Switzerland), Ruhrtriennale (Germany), the Aix-en-Provence festival (France), the Diaghilev Festival (Russia), the “Martha Argerich and Friends” festival (Hamburg, Germany), and the Salzburg Festival (Austria).

WHEN DID YOU REALIZE YOU WANTED TO BE A MUSICIAN?
As it often happens, my parents (or, in my case, my grandmother) decided I had to play a musical instrument as a child. That summer, I was staying with my grandmother in Vinnytsia (Ukraine). She worked at the Officers’ House; the only instrument that was taught there was the accordion. That’s where I was brought. When I was later studying at music school in Moscow, there was a percussion class right across from the accordion class. There was always happy noise coming from it, so I always peeked inside with envy when passing by. In my second year, I was accepted to percussion class.
WHAT MAKES PERCUSSION SPECIAL?
We have more means of self-expression. Of course, we are still limited by the notes and rhythms set by the composer but we still have more freedom than other instruments. Our range of instruments is wider, too. Whenever some blowing, scratching or rustling sounds are needed, people turn to percussion for those. That’s fun.
WHAT IS THE MOST UNUSUAL INSTRUMENT YOU HAVE EVER PLAYED?
There have been a lot of different instruments and techniques. Some of the latest ones include using a shoe brush on a piece of styrofoam or rustling with crumpled paper for Malin Bång’s “Splinters of Ebullient Rebellion”.
WHAT MUSIC DO YOU FIND MORE INTERESTING TO WORK WITH: MODERN OR OLD?
I’m interested in all kinds of music, including experimental genres. I’ve been lucky to only get really nice pieces to play.
WHAT SOUND COULD YOU LISTEN TO FOREVER?
Whether I like it or not, I constantly have to listen to car noise. I’ve even got used to it, so I feel weird when I find myself in total silence. The sound I’d never want to hear is the scratching on glass or styrofoam — although I occasionally have to produce such sounds, too. Natural sounds are of course easier on the ear.
GIVEN THE CHOICE, WHAT INSTRUMENT WOULD YOU LIKE TO MASTER?
I’m greatly intrigued to know what it feels like being a conductor and directing the whole orchestra. I’d also like to learn the oboe, tuba and cello — these are my top 3. As for percussion, I’d love to get proficient at playing African ethnic drums (such as the djembe, for instance). I’ll definitely do that at some point.

musicAeterna orchestra events

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Gustav Mahler
Symphony No. 5 in C sharp minor (1901-1902)

Alexey Retinsky
“Anaphora” for Symphony Orchestra (World Premiere)

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An event of Moscow residency

Gustav Mahler
Symphony No. 5 in C sharp minor (1901-1902)

Alexey Retinsky
“Anaphora” for Symphony Orchestra

An event of Moscow residency
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An event of Moscow residency

Gustav Mahler
Symphony No. 5 in C sharp minor (1901-1902)

Alexey Retinsky
“Anaphora” for Symphony Orchestra

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Gustav Mahler
Symphony No. 5 in C sharp minor (1901-1902)

Alexey Retinsky
“Anaphora” for Symphony Orchestra