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Bass

Dmitry Kosov

In the choir since 2019

Dmitry Kosov was born on October 1, 1989. His father, drummer Vadim Kosov, taught him music. Dmitry sang in a youth church choir and later joined the Saint Petersburg State University student choir. Dmitry’s first academic degree was in forest engineering: he graduated from the Saint Petersburg Forest Technical University in 2010 and went on to work there as assistant to the chair of heating technology and thermal power plants.

He was also studying the profession of a church chanter in the meantime. In 2015, Dmitry Kosov entered the choir conducting department of the Rimsky-Korsakov Music College, which he finished in 2019.

WHAT CHANGES IN YOU WHEN YOU GO UP ON STAGE?
The older I get, the less I change when I go to perform on stage. Of course, at my first serious performance at the age of 19 (I was then a member of the Saint Petersburg State University student choir), I was greatly impressed by the lush interiors of the Nobles’ Assembly. But performing with Maestro at Wiener Konzerthaus now, I don’t get anxious at all. I just know I have to be well-prepared and do my best.
WHAT MAKES THE MUSICAETERNA CHOIR STAND OUT?
I only recently joined the choir and to tell you the truth, I was a bit shocked to find nothing that mysterious here. I had heard a lot about musicAeterna being almost some sort of sect; but when I got here, I realized those assumptions weren’t correct. What really makes the troupe stand out is its high quality standard. All the work here is result-oriented, and there’s a sensible balance between perfectionism and humanity. Working with Teodor Currentzis is very comfortable, so I feel calm when I’m here. Teodor knows what he wants to achieve and how to express it to us.
WHAT DO YOU DREAM TO PERFORM?
Together with the musicAeterna choir, I’d like to sing more Russian choral music of the 19th and 20th century. Russia has plenty of music that hasn’t been heard enough; I assume many dislike Russian choral music because they don’t realize how beautiful Taneev’s works can sound (the same goes for sacred music by Chesnokov, Kalinnikov, Kastalsky…). I want to let people know what kind of treasure they possess. And I believe musicAeterna would be the right troupe to do that: strong emotional charge is entwined with true virtuosity here.
WHAT DOES SPIRITUAL MUSIC MEAN TO YOU?
There is always some risk in the performance of ancient spiritual music. After all, this music is, in fact, practice-oriented by its nature — it was created in order to accompany the divine service.

Performing such works, we keep the form, but do not deal with the content. Therefore, there is a risk of falling for the emotional effects and missing inherent meanings. One shouldn't confuse the experience of music with the acquisition of spirituality. Of course, aesthetics itself also gives a lot to the listener, especially in the modern world, where there is so much hurry-scurry. It helps to stop, think, and maybe it is the aesthetics that allows to learn more about the essence.

It's cool that we do it in principle, and who and how will perceive it is a matter of individual experience. I sometimes catch myself at thinking that a simple four-voice Cherubic Hymn in a small church gives a stronger and purer experience than the most thoughtful composed music work.
ASIDE FROM MUSIC, WHAT ELSE ARE YOU INTERESTED IN?
I sometimes feel I’m severely limited in my interests and only have a narrow range of hobbies. I sometimes feel envious of those having enough energy and motivation for doing sports or going hiking. When I have some free time, I mostly sleep, read books, and watch movies. I do love travelling, though. Witnessing the life of people in other cities and countries is fun. Whenever I get a chance, I grab a ticket and go travelling.

musicAeterna choir events

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Richard Wagner (1813–1883)
Opera Tristan and Isolde (1859)
Concert performance

Soloists:
Tristan — tba
Isolde — Elena Popovskaya

musicAeterna orchestra and choir
Conductor — Teodor Currentzis

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Richard Wagner (1813–1883)
Opera Tristan and Isolde (1859)
Opera in concert

Soloists
Tristan — Andreas Schager
Isolde — Brigitte Christensen
Brangäne — Eve-Maud Hubeaux
Mark — Matthias Goerne

musicAeterna orchestra and choir
Conductor — Teodor Currentzis