Bass

Dmitry Kosov

In the choir since 2019

Dmitry Kosov was born on October 1, 1989. His father, drummer Vadim Kosov, taught him music. Dmitry sang in a youth church choir and later joined the Saint Petersburg State University student choir. Dmitry’s first academic degree was in forest engineering: he graduated from the Saint Petersburg Forest Technical University in 2010 and went on to work there as assistant to the chair of heating technology and thermal power plants.

He was also studying the profession of a church chanter in the meantime. In 2015, Dmitry Kosov entered the choir conducting department of the Rimsky-Korsakov Music College, which he finished in 2019.

WHAT IS THE MOST UNUSUAL LOCATION YOU HAVE EVER PERFORMED AT?
I was once singing in the Salutaris choir at a half-destroyed uniat church of the 16th century which was standing on the shore of a lake in a village in Northern Belarus. That was at an open-air festival. We were performing at sunset and singing sacred hymns; it didn’t feel like the 21st century at all.
WHAT CHANGES IN YOU WHEN YOU GO UP ON STAGE?
The older I get, the less I change when I go to perform on stage. Of course, at my first serious performance at the age of 19 (I was then a member of the Saint Petersburg State University student choir), I was greatly impressed by the lush interiors of the Nobles’ Assembly. But performing with Maestro at Wiener Konzerthaus now, I don’t get anxious at all. I just know I have to be well-prepared and do my best.
WHAT MAKES THE MUSICAETERNA CHOIR STAND OUT?
I only recently joined the choir and to tell you the truth, I was a bit shocked to find nothing that mysterious here. I had heard a lot about musicAeterna being almost some sort of sect; but when I got here, I realized those assumptions weren’t correct. What really makes the troupe stand out is its high quality standard. All the work here is result-oriented, and there’s a sensible balance between perfectionism and humanity. Working with Teodor Currentzis is very comfortable, so I feel calm when I’m here. Teodor knows what he wants to achieve and how to express it to us.
WHAT DO YOU DREAM TO PERFORM?
Together with the musicAeterna choir, I’d like to sing more Russian choral music of the 19th and 20th century. Russia has plenty of music that hasn’t been heard enough; I assume many dislike Russian choral music because they don’t realize how beautiful Taneev’s works can sound (the same goes for sacred music by Chesnokov, Kalinnikov, Kastalsky…). I want to let people know what kind of treasure they possess. And I believe musicAeterna would be the right troupe to do that: strong emotional charge is entwined with true virtuosity here.
ASIDE FROM MUSIC, WHAT ELSE ARE YOU INTERESTED IN?
I sometimes feel I’m severely limited in my interests and only have a narrow range of hobbies. I sometimes feel envious of those having enough energy and motivation for doing sports or going hiking. When I have some free time, I mostly sleep, read books, and watch movies. I do love travelling, though. Witnessing the life of people in other cities and countries is fun. Whenever I get a chance, I grab a ticket and go travelling.

musicAeterna choir events

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Dmitry Shostakovich
Ten Poems on Texts of Revolutionary Poets (1951, Op. 88)

Frank Martin (1890-1974)
Mass for Double Choir (1926)

Goffredo Petrassi (1904-2003)
“Nonsense”, for mixed choir on poems by Edward Lear (1952)

Gyorgy Ligeti (1923-2006)
“Nonsense Madrigals” for male voices (1993)

Alexey Syumak
“1948” (world premiere!)

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Dmitry Shostakovich
Ten Poems on Texts of Revolutionary Poets (1951, Op. 88)

Frank Martin (1890-1974)
Mass for Double Choir (1926)

Goffredo Petrassi (1904-2003)
“Nonsense”, for mixed choir on poems by Edward Lear (1952)

Gyorgy Ligeti (1923-2006)
“Nonsense Madrigals” for male voices (1993)

Alexey Syumak
“1948” (world premiere!)

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Georgy Sviridov (1915-1998)
Choir Concert “Pushkin Wreath”

Frank Martin (1890-1974)
Mass for Double Choir (1926)

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An event of residency

Philippe Hersant
Choral Opera Tristia (2016)

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An event of residency

Dmitri Shostakovich
Ten Poems on Texts of Revolutionary Poets (1951, Op. 88)

Dmitri Smirnov
Prayers from St. John Chrysostom’s Liturgy for mixed choir