Alto

Elena Tokareva

In the choir since 2011

Elena Tokareva is a laureate of the International vocal competition (Kazan), the Ufa Regional competition (2nd place), and the Glinka competition.

Elena Tokareva was born in Ufa. She finished the Sabitov music school №1 specializing in piano. In 2005, she graduated from the Ufa Arts college (vocal department, academic vocals). In 2010, she graduated from the Rimsky-Korsakov Saint Petersburg State Conservatory (vocal department, academic singing; class of People’s Artist of USSR, prof. Irina Bogacheva). Elena Tokareva is currently studying for her postgraduate degree at the conservatory. During her studies, she has sung Tatiana’s part in Tchaikovsky’s “Evgeny Onegin” at the university’s theatre.

Since 2011, Elena Tokareva has been an opera troupe intern at the Perm State Opera and Ballet Theatre, as well as a member of the musicAeterna choir.

She has participated in master classes by famous opera singers Nikolay
Okhotnikov and Elena Obraztsova, as well as in acting master classes by Theodoros Terzopoulos and Viktor Kostetsky.

WHERE DO YOU DRAW CREATIVE INSPIRATION FROM?
First and foremost, our Maestro is a great role model. That alone is enough to inspire us. I certainly have other sources as well: cinematography, literature, arts. Ever since my childhood, I’ve been reading and watching a lot — and now I utilize every chance to learn something new. We tour extensively, so it’s not really a problem. Of course, I’m also inspired by the people that surround me. Their energy, ideas and feelings matter a lot to me.
WHAT HAS BEEN YOUR BIGGEST IMPRESSION LATELY?
A visit to the Modern Arts Museum in Oslo, Norway. I like paintings and movies that make you think. In Oslo, I witnessed a lot to dwell on mentally. As for the people that have impressed me, I should name Peter Sellars who I talked to while working on “Idomeneo” at the Salzburg festival. He mentioned many things that one doesn’t notice in everyday life, such as the amount of pollution in the world and our impact on the environment.
WHAT DO YOU VALUE THE MOST IN YOUR WORK?
First of all, it’s not really “work” — it’s my whole life. I truly love what I’m doing, and I can’t exist without it. What I value the most is probably the aftermath of the creative process: something that is left in my own soul and in the listeners’ hearts. I value the feeling of having introduced something to our world and — possibly — having changed it for the better.
DOES MUSIC CHANGE YOU SOMEHOW?
It certainly does. Every performance makes me a different person to some extent. It’s impossible to do it sincerely without getting fully immersed into the world created by the composer or director. And once you’ve done that, you’ll never be the same.
WHAT IS YOUR DREAM?
I prefer goal-setting to dreaming, so that I can actually reach those goals with time. Learn a new language, travel, develop myself — these are the things I strive to achieve. And I’m very happy I can combine that with my work.

musicAeterna choir events

+

Dmitry Shostakovich
Ten Poems on Texts of Revolutionary Poets (1951, Op. 88)

Frank Martin (1890-1974)
Mass for Double Choir (1926)

Goffredo Petrassi (1904-2003)
“Nonsense”, for mixed choir on poems by Edward Lear (1952)

Gyorgy Ligeti (1923-2006)
“Nonsense Madrigals” for male voices (1993)

Alexey Syumak
“1948” (world premiere!)

+

Dmitry Shostakovich
Ten Poems on Texts of Revolutionary Poets (1951, Op. 88)

Frank Martin (1890-1974)
Mass for Double Choir (1926)

Goffredo Petrassi (1904-2003)
“Nonsense”, for mixed choir on poems by Edward Lear (1952)

Gyorgy Ligeti (1923-2006)
“Nonsense Madrigals” for male voices (1993)

Alexey Syumak
“1948” (world premiere!)

+

Georgy Sviridov (1915-1998)
Choir Concert “Pushkin Wreath”

Frank Martin (1890-1974)
Mass for Double Choir (1926)

+
An event of residency

Philippe Hersant
Choral Opera Tristia (2016)

+
An event of residency

Dmitri Shostakovich
Ten Poems on Texts of Revolutionary Poets (1951, Op. 88)

Dmitri Smirnov
Prayers from St. John Chrysostom’s Liturgy for mixed choir