Alto

Ivan Petrov

In the choir since 2014

Ivan Petrov was born on March 3, 1990 in Mariinsk (Kemerovo Oblast, Russia). He finished the Mariinsk music school specializing in accordion and vocals. In 2007, Ivan entered the Glinka State Conservatory (Novosibirsk), where he studied vocals as a countertenor under Honored Artist of Tyva, Zhanna Vasilievna Chalova. In 2014, Ivan Petrov obtained his Master’s degree from the Conservatory.

CAN YOU REMEMBER YOUR FIRST MUSICAL IMPRESSION?
This was probably from the time when I was studying at music school. I was learning to play the accordion, and we had just started working on Bach’s music, which made an immense impression on me. His melodies are truly passionate, impulsive, powerful and harmonious.
TO YOU PERSONALLY, HOW IS LISTENING TO MUSIC DIFFERENT FROM PLAYING IT YOURSELF?
When I’m playing a piece, I get more immersed into it than when I’m just listening. Listening is not as intriguing; I prefer to play music. When you know the piece well enough to have grasped its very sense, you can turn off your mind when playing it — and then it feels like you are an instrument yourself, channeling the music from some greater power.
WHAT MUSIC DO YOU FIND THE MOST INSPIRING?
To me that would be music by Purcell and Monteverdi. Purcell’s melodism and Monteverdi’s harmonies appeal to me greatly.
WHAT DO YOU VALUE THE MOST IN WORKING WITH MUSICAETERNA?
MusicAeterna is a troupe that never stops evolving. We keep experimenting, we switch from music piece to music piece, we constantly learn and try something new. It is very educating, and it is really fun to do! For instance, I have recently taken a liking to Indian music and started learning to play the bansuri and the sitar. That is when I discovered that old European music (which I had considered the pinnacle of all music) stemmed from Indian raga — or had a lot in common with it, at least.
WHAT HAS BEEN YOUR FAVOURITE EXPERIMENT WITH THE MUSICAETERNA CHOIR?
The introduction of countertenors to the choir. The thing is, no other ensemble in Russia works with this type of voice. During my time at the conservatory, I could not find a job and everyone was laughing at me. So I had to work as a mime and as a photographer. This is why I am eternally grateful to Teodor for using my voice not only for old music but for classical and even contemporary music as well. This has been a unique experience.

musicAeterna choir events

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Dmitry Shostakovich
Ten Poems on Texts of Revolutionary Poets (1951, Op. 88)

Frank Martin (1890-1974)
Mass for Double Choir (1926)

Goffredo Petrassi (1904-2003)
“Nonsense”, for mixed choir on poems by Edward Lear (1952)

Gyorgy Ligeti (1923-2006)
“Nonsense Madrigals” for male voices (1993)

Alexey Syumak
“1948” (world premiere!)

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Dmitry Shostakovich
Ten Poems on Texts of Revolutionary Poets (1951, Op. 88)

Frank Martin (1890-1974)
Mass for Double Choir (1926)

Goffredo Petrassi (1904-2003)
“Nonsense”, for mixed choir on poems by Edward Lear (1952)

Gyorgy Ligeti (1923-2006)
“Nonsense Madrigals” for male voices (1993)

Alexey Syumak
“1948” (world premiere!)

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Georgy Sviridov (1915-1998)
Choir Concert “Pushkin Wreath”

Frank Martin (1890-1974)
Mass for Double Choir (1926)

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An event of residency

Philippe Hersant
Choral Opera Tristia (2016)

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An event of residency

Dmitri Shostakovich
Ten Poems on Texts of Revolutionary Poets (1951, Op. 88)

Dmitri Smirnov
Prayers from St. John Chrysostom’s Liturgy for mixed choir