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Alto

Ivan Petrov

In the choir since 2014

Ivan Petrov was born on March 3, 1990 in Mariinsk (Kemerovo Oblast, Russia). He finished the Mariinsk music school specializing in accordion and vocals. In 2007, Ivan entered the Glinka State Conservatory (Novosibirsk), where he studied vocals as a countertenor under Honored Artist of Tyva, Zhanna Vasilievna Chalova. In 2014, Ivan Petrov obtained his Master’s degree from the Conservatory.

CAN YOU REMEMBER YOUR FIRST MUSICAL IMPRESSION?
This was probably from the time when I was studying at music school. I was learning to play the accordion, and we had just started working on Bach’s music, which made an immense impression on me. His melodies are truly passionate, impulsive, powerful and harmonious.
TO YOU PERSONALLY, HOW IS LISTENING TO MUSIC DIFFERENT FROM PLAYING IT YOURSELF?
When I’m playing a piece, I get more immersed into it than when I’m just listening. Listening is not as intriguing; I prefer to play music. When you know the piece well enough to have grasped its very sense, you can turn off your mind when playing it — and then it feels like you are an instrument yourself, channeling the music from some greater power.
WHAT MUSIC DO YOU FIND THE MOST INSPIRING?
To me that would be music by Purcell and Monteverdi. Purcell’s melodism and Monteverdi’s harmonies appeal to me greatly.
WHAT DO YOU VALUE THE MOST IN WORKING WITH MUSICAETERNA?
MusicAeterna is a troupe that never stops evolving. We keep experimenting, we switch from music piece to music piece, we constantly learn and try something new. It is very educating, and it is really fun to do! For instance, I have recently taken a liking to Indian music and started learning to play the bansuri and the sitar. That is when I discovered that old European music (which I had considered the pinnacle of all music) stemmed from Indian raga — or had a lot in common with it, at least.
WHAT HAS BEEN YOUR FAVOURITE EXPERIMENT WITH THE MUSICAETERNA CHOIR?
The introduction of countertenors to the choir. The thing is, no other ensemble in Russia works with this type of voice. During my time at the conservatory, I could not find a job and everyone was laughing at me. So I had to work as a mime and as a photographer. This is why I am eternally grateful to Teodor for using my voice not only for old music but for classical and even contemporary music as well. This has been a unique experience.

musicAeterna choir events

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An event of Salzburg Festival

Dmitry Shostakovich
Symphony No. 13 in B flat minor ‘Babi Yar’ op. 113

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An event of Salzburg Festival

Paul Dessau
Guernica – Piano piece after Picasso

Karl Amadeus Hartmann
Piano Sonata ‘27. April 1945’

Dmitry Shostakovich
String Quartet No. 8 in C minor op. 110 – ‘In memory of the victims of fascism and the war’

Alfred Schnittke
Requiem for solo voices, choir and chamber ensemble

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An event of Salzburg Festival

Bela Bartok (1881 – 1945)
Bluebeard´s Castle
Opera in one act, op. 11 Sz. 48 (1918)

Carl Orff (1895 – 1982)
De temporum fine comoedia
The Play of the End of Times — Vigilia (Original version1973)

Performance by Romeo Castellucci and Teodor Currentzis

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An event of Salzburg Festival

Bela Bartok (1881 – 1945)
Bluebeard´s Castle
Opera in one act, op. 11 Sz. 48 (1918)

Carl Orff (1895 – 1982)
De temporum fine comoedia
The Play of the End of Times — Vigilia (Original version1973)

Performance by Romeo Castellucci and Teodor Currentzis

+
An event of Salzburg Festival

Bela Bartok (1881 – 1945)
Bluebeard´s Castle
Opera in one act, op. 11 Sz. 48 (1918)

Carl Orff (1895 – 1982)
De temporum fine comoedia
The Play of the End of Times — Vigilia (Original version1973)

Performance by Romeo Castellucci and Teodor Currentzis