Cello

Miriam Prandi

In the orchestra since 2019

Italian cellist Miriam Prandi was praised by the Schweizer Musikzeitung for her “sincerity of expression which is surprising” and that “one gets the impression that the cellist lives only within her playing’, following her performance of the Dvořák Cello Concerto at the Zurich Tonhalle as the only 1st Prizewinner in all string categories of the Rahn Musikpreis 2014.

Miriam Prandi has been a featured artist at Teatro alla Scala in Milano for the Festival MITO, at the Opera di Firenze for the Festival of Maggio Musicale Fiorentino where she performed both as cellist and pianist Mozart K595 Piano Concerto and Haydn C major Cello Concerto, at the Auditorium Rai in Torino for the Unione Musicale, at Al Bustan Festival in Beirut, at the Menuhin Festival Gstaad in Switzerland, at the Cultural Days of the European Union Bank in Frankfurt am Main, and at New York University and Santa Clara University in the USA, among others.

Miriam Prandi has performed as a Soloist under the baton of Vladimir Fedoseyev, Neeme Järvi, Andris Poga, Gianluca Marcianò, Michele Mariotti, Douglas Bostock, among others.

Born in Mantova, Italy in 1990, Miriam Prandi began her musical studies on piano with her father at the age of five, and continued her piano studies at the International Accademia Pianistica in Imola. Later she pursued her Cello studies with Natalia Gutman in Fiesole and Vienna. Ms. Prandi received her Soloist Master degree with ‘Distinction’ from the Hochschule der Künste Bern where she was a student of Antonio Meneses and she is also strongly influenced by her final studies with Ivan Monighetti.

Between 2015-2018 she has performed as cellist of the delian::quartett
throughout Europe in prestigious venues as Berlin Philharmonie, Konzerthaus Berlin, Rheingau Music Festival, Konzerthaus Vienna, Ludwigsburger Schlossfestspiele among others,and recorded both as cellist and pianist the complete Bach’s the Art of Fugue at the German Radio Deutschlandfunk in Cologne for the label Oehms Classics.

Miriam Prandi performs on a cello by Giovanni Grancino (Milan, 1712), a generous loan from Fondazione Pro Canale Onlus.

WHAT MADE YOU DECIDE TO BECOME A MUSICIAN?
I was quite shy during my early childhood. I remember that when I was 11 I did my first cello competition and somehow during the winners concert I felt that this was going to be my life. For the first time in my life I could communicate with a nonverbal language to an audience!
WHAT IS THE MOST DIFFICULT PART OF BEING A PROFESSIONAL MUSICIAN?
I would say concentration. Most of the times when we make mistakes or we can’t give the real maximum are because our focus is not totally on a very particular spot.
WHAT DOES IT FEEL TO PERFORM TOGETHER WITH MUSICAETERNA?
I was and I’m still the number 1 fan of this amazing ensemble. When I listened to their first live concert in Berlin Philharmonic, I felt totally in love with MusicAeterna. Being part of this artistry gives me a possibility to develop as an artist and a musician, and it inspires me greatly.
WHAT ARE YOUR THREE “DESERT ISLAND” MUSICAL ALBUMS?
— Don Giovanni by Teodor Currentzis and MusicAeterna which I think I listened more than 40 times.
— Corelli concerti grossi by Trevor Pinnock and The English concert
— Elton John ‘Love Songs’ (1995)
DO YOU HAVE A LIFE-LONG DREAM?
Continue my music journey discovering new music, playing with inspiring musicians and developing as an artist and a human being.

musicAeterna orchestra events

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Gustav Mahler
Symphony No. 5 in C sharp minor (1901-1902)

Alexey Retinsky
“Anaphora” for Symphony Orchestra (World Premiere)

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An event of Moscow residency

Gustav Mahler
Symphony No. 5 in C sharp minor (1901-1902)

Alexey Retinsky
“Anaphora” for Symphony Orchestra

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An event of Moscow residency

Gustav Mahler
Symphony No. 5 in C sharp minor (1901-1902)

Alexey Retinsky
“Anaphora” for Symphony Orchestra

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Gustav Mahler
Symphony No. 5 in C sharp minor (1901-1902)

Alexey Retinsky
“Anaphora” for Symphony Orchestra