Bass

Pavel Kharalgin

In the choir since 2017

WHAT DOES MUSIC MEAN TO YOU?
Music signifies the hope for the world to persist and for the good to be triumphant. Music is a chance to get away from everyday problems and to get closer to the truth. I may be just fantasizing, and it might sound pretentious, but I do believe music makes the world a little kinder and more beautiful.
ASIDE FROM YOUR CREATIVE WORK, WHAT ELSE ARE YOU INTERESTED IN?
My family plays an immense part in my life. My children stump me sometimes: the are growing up, so they ask questions and demand explanations. It is my duty to find the right words and teach them valuable lessons instead of just repeating old tired mantras. I want to show my children the way to beauty. I guess bringing up a child is a challenge — but it’s also a great pleasure when you succeed.
WHAT MUSIC DO YOU DREAM TO PERFORM?
I don’t have any specific goals regarding particular music pieces or particular stages. I’m interested in performing all of the classical repertoire.
DOES IT MATTER TO YOU WHO YOUR AUDIENCE IS?
The best listener is the one that can actually listen. Not the one that goes to concerts because it’s cool and fashionable but the one that is sincerely interested in music. Performing in front of such an audience is a great responsibility, but seeing grateful and understanding faces among the listeners is extremely rewarding.
WHAT DO YOU VALUE THE MOST IN WORKING WITH MUSICAETERNA?
I’ve been with musicAeterna since 2017 and — for what it’s worth — I feel that I’m growing spiritually. I’ve become more attentive towards myself and towards others. To be frank, there was a period following my graduation from the conservatory when art and creative work started feeling just like a regular job to me. But now I’m thoroughly enjoying the process and experiencing new emotions. This is what creative work is really about, and it gives me the strength to keep moving forward.

musicAeterna choir events

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Dmitry Shostakovich
Ten Poems on Texts of Revolutionary Poets (1951, Op. 88)

Frank Martin (1890-1974)
Mass for Double Choir (1926)

Goffredo Petrassi (1904-2003)
“Nonsense”, for mixed choir on poems by Edward Lear (1952)

Gyorgy Ligeti (1923-2006)
“Nonsense Madrigals” for male voices (1993)

Alexey Syumak
“1948” (world premiere!)

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Dmitry Shostakovich
Ten Poems on Texts of Revolutionary Poets (1951, Op. 88)

Frank Martin (1890-1974)
Mass for Double Choir (1926)

Goffredo Petrassi (1904-2003)
“Nonsense”, for mixed choir on poems by Edward Lear (1952)

Gyorgy Ligeti (1923-2006)
“Nonsense Madrigals” for male voices (1993)

Alexey Syumak
“1948” (world premiere!)

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Georgy Sviridov (1915-1998)
Choir Concert “Pushkin Wreath”

Frank Martin (1890-1974)
Mass for Double Choir (1926)

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An event of residency

Philippe Hersant
Choral Opera Tristia (2016)

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An event of residency

Dmitri Shostakovich
Ten Poems on Texts of Revolutionary Poets (1951, Op. 88)

Dmitri Smirnov
Prayers from St. John Chrysostom’s Liturgy for mixed choir