fbpx
Tenore

Sergei Godin

In the choir since 2017

Sergei Godin is a laureate of the International vocal competition at the Slavic music festival (Moscow, 2006).

Sergei graduated from the Vladimir music college of performing arts in 2004. In 2009, he graduated from the Gnessin Russian Music Academy.

In 2006–2017, he was a soloist at the Moscow state academic chamber choir (directed and conducted by Vladimir Minin). In 2017, he was a soloist at the Pokrovsky Chamber Music Theatre (Moscow). Since 2018, Sergei Godin has been a soloist at the Perm State Opera and Ballet Theatre. As a soloist, he has performed the following parts: Lensky (“Eugene Onegin” by Tchaikovsky), Almaviva (“The Barber of Seville” by Rossini), the tenor part in “Jeanne aû bucher” by Honegger, the tenor part in “Close My Eyes”, Ferrando (“Cosi fan tutte” by Mozart), and Basilio (“Le nozze di Figaro” by Mozart).

He has participated in concert performances of Mozart’s “Mercy of Titus” and “Idomeneo” (lead parts in both). He has also performed the tenor parts in Beethoven’s “Symphony No.9” and Mozart’s “Requiem” conducted by Teodor Currentzis.

He has been invited to perform at the Croatian National Opera (Zagreb). Sergei Godin has also worked with such conductors as Vladimir Andropov, Mikhail Pletnev, Vladimir Fedoseev, Vladimir Spivakov, Wayne Marshall and others.

Since the 2017/2018 season, Sergei Godin has been a member of the
musicAeterna choir.

WHAT MADE YOU DECIDE TO BECOME A MUSICIAN?
My family is not that musical: my father used to be a factory worker and my mother worked at a kindergarten. However, they always used to sing while at home, and I probably got my love towards music from them. According to my mother, I was once watching a cartoon where a grasshopper was playing the violin, and I said I wanted to play the violin too. I was 3 or 4 years old at the time. Without missing a beat, my parents went to Moscow and bought a violin for me. It wasn’t easy to do at the time but they managed it. So I started learning to play the violin, then the piano, and then I went to the choir capella and started growing as a singer.
DO YOU REMEMBER YOUR FIRST ON-STAGE PERFORMANCE?
Yes. Together with my sister, we sang at the city competition called “The Crystal Bells”. Our duo was quite popular in the city, and we performed quite a lot. But we were just 7 or 8 at the time, so we didn’t take those performances seriously; there was no fear or anxiety. Of course, things are different now: each performance is a responsibility, so I put my best effort into them. And each performance is also a great pleasure. I don’t think I could ever abandon the stage. Even if something drastic happens in my life, I can’t imagine myself doing anything else. Music and theatre are definitely my calling.
WHAT IS YOUR TYPICAL SCHEDULE ON THE DAY OF A PERFORMANCE?
We tend to rehearse extensively before each concert or play, so I always try to give myself some time off when the day of the performance comes. I just relax and take my mind off everything. I take a walk in the park, lie down on my sofa, just spend some time with my family. I need all this in order to be in my best shape by the evening. As for the emotional preparation for my part, it’s a different matter and a gradual process. Over the course of all the rehearsals, together with the director I search for various clues and resonating features my character might possess, and I use those to get into character later.
WHAT IS YOUR DREAM?
I don’t think I can voice my dreams right now for fear of sounding too impudent. I do dream big though. I’m not an extremely ambitious or cocky person — I just believe it’s worth dreaming of something that is impossible to achieve right now. This can yield great benefits in the future.
ASIDE FROM MUSIC, WHAT ELSE GIVES YOU GREAT PLEASURE?
My children, of course. My wife. My parents. I don’t get to meet them all too often now — but those meetings energize me and keep me afloat.

musicAeterna choir events

+

Gabriel Fauré
Pavane, Op. 50 for Orchestra and Choir (1887-1888)

Jean Sibelius
Symphonic suite “Pelléas et Mélisande”, Op.46 (1905)

Gabriel Fauré
Requiem, op. 48

The musicAeterna Orchestra and Choir conducted by Teodor Currentzis
Soprano — Fanie Antonelou (Greece)
Baritone — Thomas Mole (Great Britain)

+

Gabriel Fauré
Pavane, Op. 50 for Orchestra and Choir (1887-1888)

Jean Sibelius
Symphonic suite “Pelléas et Mélisande”, Op.46 (1905)

Gabriel Fauré
Requiem, op. 48

The musicAeterna Orchestra and Choir conducted by Teodor Currentzis
Soprano — Fanie Antonelou (Greece)
Baritone — Thomas Mole (Great Britain)

Video artwork — Mat Collishaw

 

 

+

Gabriel Fauré
Pavane, Op. 50 for Orchestra and Choir (1887-1888)

Jean Sibelius
Symphonic suite “Pelléas et Mélisande”, Op.46 (1905)

Gabriel Fauré
Requiem, op. 48

The musicAeterna Orchestra and Choir conducted by Teodor Currentzis
Soprano — Fanie Antonelou (Greece)
Baritone — Thomas Mole (Great Britain)

+

Ludwig van Beethoven (1770–1827)
Symphony No 9 in D Minor (1824)

+

Alfred Schnittke (1934–1998)
Requiem (1975) for soloists, mixed choir and instrumental ensemble,
Concerto for mixed chorus a capella set to verses by Grigor Narekatsi (1984–1985)

Gregor Mayrhofer (b. 1987)
Recycling Concerto (2021)