Alto

Lev Serov

In the orchestra since 2019

Lev Serov graduated from the Moscow Tchaikovsky State Conservatory in 2001, having studied viola (under professor G.I. Odinets) and chamber ensemble playing (under professor T.A. Gaidamovich). Along with his conservatory studies, Lev Serov was preparing for the international string quartet competition at V.A. Berlinsky’s class.

As a member of the “Romantic Quartet”, Lev Serov received his first award and seven special prizes at the Vth Shostakovich International Competition in 1999. He toured around Russia and the world, along with participating in several music festivals: the D. Oistrakh festival in Pärnu (Estonia), the A. Arensky festival, “The young for the young” festival at the Lingotto Center (Turin, Italy), and the “Art of Quartet — Beethoven-Bartók” festival (Moscow, Russia).

Lev Serov has taken part in concerts by the Borodin State Quartet at the Moscow Conservatory hall.

Since January 2008, he has been a member of the Glinka State Quartet. Since August 2019, Lev Serov has been part of the musicAeterna orchestra.

WHAT BROUGHT YOU TO THE WORLD OF MUSIC?
In fact, I became a musician against all odds. It wasn’t an easy path. There are no other musicians in my family. In addition, I was born in a small district near the city of Orel — a place where even a decent basic music education was hard to come by. Music was just one of my many hobbies as a child. However, I was lucky to meet a teacher who taught me the basics and, most importantly, made me understand there were opportunities for development. Everything did fall into place eventually: working with Maestro is the best opportunity I could have ever asked for.
WHAT DO YOU VALUE THE MOST IN WORKING WITH MUSICAETERNA?
A lot of music is now performed mechanically. That’s why academic music concerts can get pretty boring: there’s no spark, even among the performers themselves. They have no understanding of what they are doing and why; instead, they just play the notes. Maestro, however, has a unique gift. It isn’t just the result of education, outlook or experience — it’s something greater, something that few people possess. Right now, I’m happy to act as a transmitter of ideas the origin of which is often unknown to me.
HOW DO YOU TYPICALLY WORK ON A MUSIC PIECE?
The main body of work is done with Maestro. You can play a piece with no mistakes whatsoever, but it isn’t enough to actually turn it into music. What Maestro shows you is that a music phrase doesn’t exist on its own: instead, its interpretation stems from its very nature. He explains, he shows, he sings — and he reaches his goal: ultimately, we play music the exact way he hears it.
WHAT OTHER HOBBIES DO YOU HAVE ASIDE FROM MUSIC?
Visual art, I guess: cinema, photography. Sports as well, particularly football. I enjoy playing football with people from the orchestra when we have some free time.
WHAT IS YOUR DREAM?
Mine is quite mercantile: someday, I hope to purchase a very good instrument. And I dream to give my child the proper upbringing.

musicAeterna orchestra events

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An event of residency

Gustav Mahler
Symphony No. 5 in C sharp minor (1901-1902)

Alexey Retinsky
“Anaphora” for Symphony Orchestra (World Premiere)

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Gustav Mahler
Symphony No. 5 in C sharp minor (1901-1902)

Alexey Retinsky
“Anaphora” for Symphony Orchestra

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An event of residency

Philippe Hersant
Choral Opera Tristia (2016)